Partner Visa Interview preparation questions: What will the case officer ask?




Partner visa interview questionsTo be better prepared for your upcoming partner visa interview

  1. Know the types of questions to be asked

  2. Be sure there are no contradictions (after all, not all new couples are completely familiar with every detail of their partner’s life)

  3. Improve your understanding of how case officers assess answers to questions

When applying for Partner visas through to permanent residency (either subclass 820/801, 300 or 309/100 Offshore Partner visas), Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) case officers will most likely conduct a face to face or phone interview with applicant, and in some cases, the sponsor as well.

Although there are a standard range of questions you are likely to be asked, case officers will sometimes ask questions that are completely unexpected. The reason they do this is to try and weed out the genuine from the non-genuine applicants. That is, they are attempting to apply the genuine applicant test which requires looking for inconsistencies in accounts and claims by applicants.




Discovery of inconsistencies between interview notes, claims made on the initial application and supporting documentation will raise the red flag of credibility. Applicants seen to be failing the credibility test will be further investigated and are, by this action, at risk of being refused.

Download our Partner Visa Interview Preparation Guide for only $5AUD!

The Guide features

  • Extensive and exhaustive list of interview questions

  • Explanatory notes on process of evaluation by case officers assessing answers to interview questions

  • Checklist of documentary evidence the case officer should have in relation to your partner visa application. 





It is important therefore that when going into a partner visa interview, and this applies for immigration interviews for a range of visas in general — that your answers are natural, genuine and accurate. It is a good practice to be yourself, and not to give answers you think the case officer wants to hear, or answers that you think will make your case more successful potentially. Failing the credibility test can lead to a visa refusal, so at all times, just be natural and be yourself!

The downloadable list of questions is an exhaustive and extensive list compiled over years of dealings with case officers and clients.

The questions are equally valid and useful for

  • face to face interviews,
  • telephone interviews,
  • Tribunal appeals,
  • Ministerial pleadings as evidence of ‘compelling and compassionate’ nature,
  • for applicants, onshore and offshore, from a range of countries.

 

 

DON’T RISK YOUR APPLICATION ON SIMPLE MISTAKES DURING CASE OFFICER INTERVIEW!

BE PREPARED!

 

 




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Beware ‘bogus documentation’ when applying for a visa to travel to or remain in Australia (Part 3)

HOW DO DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION AND BORDER PROTECTION CASE OFFICERS ASSESS FOR BOGUS DOCUMENTS?

cancelAll forms of correspondence such as email,text messaging, blogging, letters, postcards and the like are used extensively by departmental case officers to corroborate stories, accounts, claims made in applications, etc. It is important when compiling such material as documentary evidence, such as in demonstrating relationship between sponsor and applicant, that different sources and modes of communication are used. This is a form of cross-checking you can do on the case officer’s behalf.

Traditional forms of communication such as letters are carefully analysed and scrutinised for authenticity and veracity (ie. truthfulness). Envelopes are noted for origin, date of time stamp and even style.The method of postal sending and receipt is understood in order that the case officer can make an assessment of how likely or possible a form of communication can be. For example, an applicant may claim that regular mail correspondence was sent from a certain remote location in country X to country Y. In checking the operations of the postal system in both countries and the form of postal communication used, case officers can assess the claims using this sort of background analysis.

Other things to be aware of when using traditional modes of hand writing that the level of analysis used on the paper used, thicknesses, weight, colours, sealant used on envelopes (such as glue), creases and impressions on paper etc. The same applies for analysis of the hand written word, down to type and colour of pen, pressure used by hand writer and style of writing. Comparisons are made of earlier and later forms of hand written documentation evidence to ensure consistency throughout.

Communications may also take different forms according to the cultural ideosyncrasies of the region in which the applicant resides or originates. It could be worthwhile in your dealings with the departmental case officer to point such things out in order to avoid suspicion of handling and submitting bogus documentation.

The hints, tips and tricks above are a guide only and not a definitive discussion of all methods used by the Department in checking the authenticity and validity of documentation. If unsure, seek professional advice from a MARA registered migration agent or lawyer.

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